Drop down and give me…your greatest strength!

Created by: Katie Smith, 2012-2013 Career Advising Fellow

This past weekend, Mikki and I joined our colleagues Michelle Jones, Rhonda Kosusko, Lauren Limerick, and Pam Brumbaugh in leading the Arts and Sciences Job Search Boot Camp, an intensive all-day series of workshops for students serious about making progress on their job search preparedness.  At 9:30 on Saturday morning, twelve motivated and enthusiastic undergraduate students came to Belk library ready to learn new information and enhance their skills in a variety of areas.

I started the day by leading an exercise on creating and delivering an elevator speech, or a 30-second professional commercial highlighting your education, experience, skills, and professional goals. Students had a chance to stand up and practice their elevator speeches with five different partners. As they say, practice makes perfect.

Throughout the day students learned tips for building a strong resume, online resources available through the Elon Student Professional Development Center, interviewing techniques, and how to network successfully while also learning just how connected this small group already was through family members, friends, and other people in their lives. Three separate times throughout the day, small groups convened to practice answers to typical interview questions such as “tell me about yourself” and “talk about your greatest strength and your greatest weakness,” as well as a host of behavioral questions, or questions that often require the interviewee to discuss an example or situation to demonstrate experience, skills, and/or knowledge of a specific topic.

At the end of the day, students walked away with tons of information and the motivation to continue their hard work. Although the students expressed greater confidence in their resumes and interviewing skills after completing boot camp, we encouraged them to continue using our office as a resource for job search preparation and for career development, as these processes are never truly done.

Practicing a firm handshake

Pam helps students develop strong answers to common interview questions

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